A Feast of Tzimmes

We’re back for season 4! We apologize for the delay but what is time anymore? We return with an exploration of a hearty stew that has come to epitomize the fall harvest and the High Holidays. We discuss the symbolism of tzimmes’s different ingredients, how geography affects the evolution of dishes (shocker), and why you stew certain cuts of meat and not others. Finally, we end with a public health PSA: wash your hands, wear a mask, stay six feet apart!

The Final Showdown: A Trivia Special

It’s our season finale, and this time, we wanted to end on a happy note, and the happiest thing we could do is bring back a very special guest: the one, the only, the incomparable Mary. We quiz her on Victorian sweets, reassess American geography, and revisit the history of starches.

Finally, this week, we’re asking, if you can, to donate to The Okra Project, which provides Black Trans people with home cooked meals: https://www.theokraproject.com

Olives in the Time of Martinis

We’re done with the rice chronicles, and hurtling towards the end of the season, so this week, we don’t even cover food! Instead, snuggle up with your favorite quarantini, because it’s time to talk about the birth of the fanciest cocktail. We discuss Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Yalta conference hangover, why you might ever muddle an olive, and FDR’s infamously terrible cocktails. Finally, we debate whether or not Joseph Stalin invented the pickleback.

The Rice Chronicles, Part 7: Gimbap Style

This week, we reach the end of the Tolstoyesque saga that has been The Rice Chronicles. We return to one of our first stops on our journey with rice to discuss parallel histories of rice and fermentation in Japan and Korea, some old and classic colonialism tactics, and the key differences between gimbap and sushi, because they are not the same! Finally, we explain why Korean culinary history can be difficult to trace aka why gimbap has so many names.

The Rice Chronicles, Part 6: Where the Wild Rice Grows

We’re continuing our rice series by not talking about rice. Instead, we head to North America to talk about an aquatic grain that has played a central role in Indigenous cuisine across the Great Lakes region for centuries. We discuss how wild rice is harvested, the role of wild rice in the origin story of the Ojibwe, and the evolution of the wild rice economy. Finally, we give you a glimpse into our storied podcast planning process.

The Rice Chronicles, Part 5: Antony and Kosheri

Our rice series continues, and this week we move further west and into Egypt to discuss a cherished rice and lentil dish. We discuss the history of lentils and rice as a combination, migration during the heyday of the British Empire, and why pasta makes a guest appearance in kosheri. Finally, we revisit the connections between carboloading and street food.

The Rice Chronicles, Part 4: Tahdig for Everyone

Happy self isolation, and please enjoy our first episode of the new social distancing landscape. In this episode of our rice series, we’re leaving East Asia and heading to Iran to talk about one of the country’s most beloved rice dishes. We discuss how rice arrived to Central Asia, the rich cooking culture of the Safavid Empire, and the pre-Islamic origins fo Nowruz, aka Persian New Year. Finally, we speculate which Christian scholars may have dabbled with non-Christian faiths.

The Rice Chronicles, Part 2: Rice and Roll

This week, we’re continuing our rice series and discover how the histories of rice and sushi are intertwined. We discuss how to ferment fish, revisit the street food revolution of the Edo period, and explore how a humble dish became an elevated art form in Japanese cuisine. Finally, we talk about how refrigeration revolutionized so many of the beloved foods we’ve discussed so far.

The Rice Chronicles, Part 1

This week, we’re kicking off another starchy series as we dive into the origins of a certain white grain. We discuss how to control rivers, how a good starch can help grown an empire, and the history of boating in the South Pacific. Finally, Faye explains why anthropology degrees can help you succeed in the world.